Oades, Robert D.; Kreul, Katja:
Anomalous processing in schizophrenia suggests adaptive event-action coding requires multiple executive brain mechanisms. A commentary on "The theory of event coding (TEC): A framework for perception and action planning"
2001
In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Jg. 24 (2001), Heft 5, S. 895 - 896
Artikel/Aufsatz in Zeitschrift / Fach: Medizin
Titel:
Anomalous processing in schizophrenia suggests adaptive event-action coding requires multiple executive brain mechanisms. A commentary on "The theory of event coding (TEC): A framework for perception and action planning"
Autor(in):
Oades, Robert D. im Online-Personal- und -Vorlesungsverzeichnis LSF anzeigen; Kreul, Katja
Erscheinungsjahr:
2001
Erschienen in:
Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Jg. 24 (2001), Heft 5, S. 895 - 896
ISSN:
DuEPublico ID:
DOI:
URN:

Abstract:

Traditional approaches to human information processing tend to deal with perception and action planning in isolation, so that an adequate account of the perception-action interface is still missing. On the perceptual side, the dominant cognitive view largely underestimates, and thus fails to account for, the impact of action-related processes on both the processing of perceptual information and on perceptual learning. On the action side, most approaches conceive of action planning as a mere continuation of stimulus processing, thus failing to account for the goal-directedness of even the simplest reaction in an experimental task. We propose a new framework for a more adequate theoretical treatment of perception and action planning, in which perceptual contents and action plans are coded in a common representational medium by feature codes with distal reference. Perceived events (perceptions) and to-be-produced events (actions) are equally represented by integrated, task-tuned networks of feature codes – cognitive structures we call event codes. We give an overview of evidence from a wide variety of empirical domains, such as spatial stimulus-response compatibility, sensorimotor synchronization, and ideomotor action, showing that our main assumptions are well supported by the data.